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Community-based forest management the way forward

Forestry experts are optimistic about the future in Vietnam, largely thanks to community-based forest management. The model is developing extensively in the country, and experts have lauded its ability to increase forest recover, limit deforestation and create income from forests for local people. Nguyen Viet Dung from PanNature, a Vietnamese not-for-profit organisation that works to protect nature, said at recent seminar in Hanoi: “People’s participation in forest conservation and management is very important.”

Promoting Community-based Conservation Initiatives in Vietnam

Along with the population growth and pressure from the human needs, natural ecological areas in Vietnam such as forests, wetlands, coastal mangrove forests ... have been rapidly narrowed, fragmented and degraded. Accordingly, not only biodiversity and ecological values have been lost, but many traditional cultural values of the community associated with nature have also been eroded. On December 20-21, 2018, in Dak Lak, People and Nature Reconciliation (PanNature) in collaboration with Dak Lak Union of Science & Technology Associations organized the workshop: “Promoting community-based conservation initiatives that contribute to preserving cultural and ecological diversity in Vietnam” in order to create opportunities for communities’ representatives and related organizations to share and discuss this topic.

Gender Equality and Social Inclusion in FLEGT

The seminar on Gender Equality and Social Inclusion in Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT): Policy Prospects and Implications took place on August 30, in Hanoi. The event is a part of the project Strengthening Non-state actors’ Voices for Improved Forest Governance in the Mekong Region (EU-NSA Mekong) funded by the European Union, jointly implemented by The Center for People and Forests (RECOFTC), People and Nature Reconciliation (PanNature) and World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in Vietnam.

Lesson Learnt on Tourism Development in National Parks and Nature Reserves

On July 21th, 2018, in Danang, People and Nature Reconciliation (PanNature) in collaboration with Da Nang Union of Science & Technology Associations, GreenViet Biodiversity Conservation Centre (GreenViet) and Environment & Biological Resource Teaching Research Team (DN-EBR) organized the first international workshop on "Biodiversity conservation and sustainable development in the Central and Highlands", with the 2018 topic is “Lesson learnt on tourism development in National Parks and Nature Reserves”.

How Halong bay Floating Village has changed since locals move to the mainland?

The USAID funded project has been successful due to cooperation from many people and groups. It has been implemented by Centre for Marinelife Conversation and Community Development (MCD) and its Partners and Nature Reconciliation (PanNature) and the Center for Environment and Community Research (CECR), along with cooperation from Quang Ninh province People’s Committee, relevant agencies, enterprises, NGOs,…and local communities in the alliance, advice from national and international experts.

MEKONG RESOURCES FORUM III: Development Impacts and Resilience in Agriculture and Forestry in the Mekong Region

The third Mekong Resouces Forum with tittle: "Development Impacts and Resilience in Agriculture and Forestry in the Mekong Region" was held on 15 – 16 June 2017, in Hoa Binh, Vietnam by PanNature in co-operation with ADDA, the International Centre for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF), and Vietnam-Lao-Cambodia Association for Economic Cooperation Development (VILACAED). There were about 100 participants from community and non-state organizations in the Lower Mekong region, research and academic institutions, representatives from governmental agencies, media and other interested parties took part in the event. The main objectives of the forum: To share issues, concerns, lessons learned, good practices and perspectives in agriculture and forestry sectors in relation to resilience and adaptation to environmental changes at different levels; and To discuss and promote better development alternatives and approaches in order to secure fair and equitable access to natural resources, improve livelihoods and quality of life and ensure sustainability of our living environment.

Workshop: Sustainable Agricultural Investment of Vietnamese Businesses in the Mekong Sub-region

Acknowledging the environmental and social risks of overseas agriculture investment, the Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry, People and Nature Reconciliation and Oxfam in Vietnam have conducted research to rapidly assess the reality of agricultural investment in Laos and Cambodia. It aims to identify the problem and mobilize the Pioneer Enterprise Group to initiate development of Voluntary Guidelines to mitigate environmental and social risks for Vietnamese enterprises investing in the agricultural sector in the Mekong sub-region. This workshop on “Sustainable Agricultural Investment of Vietnamese Businesses in the Mekong Sub-region” is organised based on this research and the draft Voluntary Guidelines for Enterprises. The organisers hope that the workshop would be a forum for enterprises, government agencies, and civil society organisations to exchange experience and solutions to finalize the Voluntary Guidelines and contribute to Vietnam’s overseas investment policy.

Using REDD+ Policy to Facilitate Climate Adaptation at the Local Level: Synergies and Challenges in Vietnam

Attention has recently been paid to how REDD+ mitigation policies are integrated into other sectoral policies, particularly those dealing with climate adaptation at the national level. But there is less understanding of how subnational policy and local projects are able to incorporate attention to adaptation; therefore, we use a case study in Vietnam to discuss how REDD+ projects and policies address both concerns of mitigation and adaptation together at subnational levels. Through stakeholder interviews, focus groups, and household surveys in three provinces of Vietnam with REDD+ activities, our research sought to understand if REDD+ policies and projects on the ground acknowledge that climate change is likely to impact forests and forest users; if this knowledge is built into REDD+ policy and activities; how households in forested areas subject to REDD+ policy are vulnerable to climate change; and how REDD+ activities can help or hinder needed adaptations. Our findings indicate that there continues to be a lack of coordination between mitigation and adaptation policies in Vietnam, particularly with regard to REDD+. Policies for forest-based climate mitigation at the national and subnational level, as well as site-based projects, have paid little attention to the adaptation needs of local communities, many of whom are already suffering from noticeable weather changes in their localities, and there is insufficient discussion of how REDD+ activities could facilitate increased resilience. While there were some implicit and coincidental adaptation benefits of some REDD+ activities, most studied projects and policies did not explicitly target their activities to focus on adaptation or resilience, and in at least one case, negative livelihood impacts that have increased household vulnerability to climate change were documented. Key barriers to integration were identified, such as sectoral specialization; a lack of attention in REDD+ projects to livelihoods; and inadequate support for ecosystem-based adaptation.
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