Tag: Wildlife trade

Experts discuss ways to protect tigers

Experts discussed Vi?t Nam’s efforts to protect tigers and other endangered animals at a forum yesterday.

The forum was held in Hà N?i by the PanNature and the Wildlife Conservation Society Vietnam in response to International Tiger Day (July 29).

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Seminar: The Fate of Tigers and the Status of Endangered Species Conservation in Vietnam

On the occasion of International Tiger Conservation Day (29/7), People and Nature Reconciliation (PanNature) in cooperation with WCS organized the seminar “The Fate of Tigers and the Status of Endangered Species Conservation in Vietnam” in order to review and discuss on-going wildlife conservation efforts in Vietnam and to identify constraints, challenges, prospects and opportunities for the future.

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Policy Review “Vietnam’s Wildlife: Drained & Unsustained”

PanNature’s Policy Newsletter No. 29-30 (Quarters I-II/2018) with the topic: “Vietnam Wildlife: Drained & Unsustained” analyzed the current status of illegal wildlife trade in Vietnam, difficulties in law enforcement and conservation, some policy and legal constraints, and recommendations to authorities to revise policies and tighten the enforcement of the wildlife protection laws.

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Workshop Looks to Expand Network of Wildlife Reporters in Vietnam

A refresher course for journalists on reporting about the conservation and rescue of wild animals began in the northern province of Vinh Phuc on May 21.

The two-day event aims to popularise the reality of and reasons for wildlife trafficking, as well as share experiences of reporters and experts and expand the network of journalists reporting on the issue.

It is organised by PanNature, a Vietnamese non-profit organisation dedicated to protecting and conserving diversity of life.

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Raising bears for gall poses challenge for environmentalists in Vietnam

The documents compiled by PanNature say there is no evidence showing that breeding bears can have a positive impact on wild bear populations in Vietnam, and the breeding has no use for the conservation of the species.

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PanNature, GreenID: Environmental Heroes

PanNature believes that in order to protect forests and biodiversity, people, community and social organizations need to have the right to join forest management activities. 

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Wildlife trafficking still at serious levels in Vietnam

As a hotspot for wildlife trafficking and consumption since the late 80s, Vietnam is facing a risk of depletion of biodiversity.

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Law enforcement officers and journalists honored for their contribution to wildlife protection

HANOI, October 14, 2015 — Today, the United States Agency for International (USAID), Freeland and Education for Nature – Vietnam (ENV) hosted the second annual “Outstanding Achievement Awards for Wildlife Protection” ceremony to honor five law enforcement officers and two journalists for their contributions to the protection of wildlife in Vietnam.

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World Wildlife Day

On March 3, the U.S. Embassy’s American Center Hanoi organized an event to celebrate the first globally recognized World Wildlife Day. More than sixty Vietnamese youth attended the program that began with a short, thought-provoking film on wildlife conservation practices in the United States. The film is the fifth, and final, part of a series on environmental issues, produced by Vietnamese broadcast journalists through the PAS-sponsored TV Coop program. The series was aired on national TV and is scheduled to be aired again soon.

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Illegal bush-meat, wildlife trafficking at alarming levels

QUANG NINH — Viet Nam’s ecosystem was seriously threatened by the widespread consumption of wild meat and trafficking of wildlife, experts said at a recent conference.

Urgent action was needed on several fronts to prevent this destruction of the nation’s wildlife and their habitat, they said.

They called for strengthened, more effective public awareness campaigns against hunting and trafficking in wild animals and for the inclusion of this subject in the school curriculum, especially in rural areas.

Tom Osbon of the Viet Nam-based Wildlife Management Office stressed the need to legalise multi-sectoral co-operation in preventing, discovering and punishing forest violations in order to protect wild animals effectively.

“It is also very important to establish special inspectors in localities which record a high number of violations,” he added.

Dr Scott Roberton, head of Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), said that hunting wild animals for meat and trafficking had been happening in many countries, especially developing ones.

In Viet Nam, hunting and trade in wild animals had been alarming, he said.

A WCS study conducted at 200 restaurants in the central region found they consumed nearly 2 million wild animals per year. Among them, stag and wild boar accounted for around 70 per cent of the consumed meat, followed by turtle, snake, fox and porcupine.

The study estimated the demand of wild animal consumption nationwide at nearly 4,500 tonnes per year.

The Forest Protection Department discovered 1,042 violations of wild animal protection laws last year, a decrease of 400 cases over 2008, the conference heard.

Dr Nguyen Viet Dung, deputy head of the Centre for People and Nature Reconciliation, said that the real number was much higher.

Roberton added that Viet Nam was also an important link in the international wild animal trafficking chain.

Last year, authorities found more than six tonnes of elephant tusks trafficked from Africa to Hai Phong City.

And, in 2008, more than 20 tonnes of pangolins (anteaters) and their scales were seized in Viet Nam as they were being trafficked from Indonesia to China.

The Mong Cai Border Gate was one of places where wild animal trafficking is frequent.

Over the last two years, authorities have discovered 57 cases of trafficking in wild animals involving more than 7,612 individuals including monkeys and Tibetan bears and elephant tusks.

Source: Vietnam News

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